1973-1979 Jaguar XJ6/XJ12 Series II

Initial changes involved stronger, higher-set bumpers (the front one prompting an abbreviated grille) and updated instrument panel with all gauges grouped in front of the driver and a large center vent for the improved air conditioning. Late ’74 brought four additions to the line: six- and 12-cylinder XJC hardtop coupes and a similar pair of “L” (long) sedans with the wheelbase stretched four inches for additional rear leg room. The latter sold so well that they eventually supplanted the original standard-wheelbase sedans entirely. Few other year-to-year changes save switching the automatic transmission from the outmoded Borg-Warner to a more modern GM Turbo Hydra-Matic during 1976. Both V-12 and XK six retained dual carburetors (fuel injection for American cars in 1978-79) and power ratings close to Series I levels, even on emissions-tuned American models. The XJ6 2.8 remained a tax-beating “economy special” mainly for Europe. Equivalent Daimler Sovereign and Double Six continued (respective total production: 20,075 and 4292), but again not for the U

Victoria Beckham Layered Dress

Victoria Beckham Layered Dress

BUY NOW

£578.18
£88.52

.S. Pluses of the 1973-1979 Jaguar XJ6/XJ12 Series II:

Minuses of the 1973-1979 Jaguar XJ6/XJ12 Series II:
Production of the 1973-1979 Jaguar XJ6/XJ12 Series II:
Production of the 1973-1979 Jaguar XJ12 Series II:
Specifications of the 1973-1979 Jaguar XJ6/XJ12 Series II: Length, inches: 194.8 (L: 198.8) Wheelbase, inches: 108.8 (L:112.8) Weight, pounds: 3,950-4,300 Price, new: $10,300-20,000 (in U.S.) Engines for the 1973-1979 Jaguar XJ6/XJ12 Series II:

1947-1948 Isotta Fraschini 8C Monterosa

The 1947-1948 Isotta Fraschini 8C Monterosa provided a last glimpse at glory from what had been one of the world’s top automakers before the market for its luxurious products dried up in the early 1930s. Then, in the wake of World War II, came dreams of a revival.
The scars of world war were still fresh across Europe in the lean year of 1947, both on the landscape and throughout societies seeking to reorganize themselves after horrible years of devastation. That’s why it seemed astonishing to the car world that former Italian luxury maker Isotta Fraschini had sensational plans to revive its lost glory.
The vehicle for this attempted renaissance would be the Tipo 8C Monterosa, named for the Via Monterosa, the Milan street upon which Isotta Fraschini’s shops had stood during its greatest days. However, by 1947, Isotta Fraschini was a name nearly forgotten after 13 years of inactivity as a luxury carmaker (though the manufacture of trucks and engines for boats and aircraft sustained it through the 1930s and 1940s). The development of the revolutionary new luxury car in the works was inseparably linked with the name of an extraordinary engineer: Fabio Rapi.
Classic Cars Image Gallery
Given that it has been more than 50 years since Isotta Fraschini last made a car, it may not be possible for the modern automobile enthusiast to fully appreciate the significance of the 8C Monterosa project without some background. Having made their initial foray into the automobile business as importers of French cars, Cesare Isotta and Vincenzo Fraschini next formed a company that would lead, in 1902

Victoria Beckham Dresses

Victoria Beckham Silk And Wool Sleeveless Dress White

BUY NOW

£578.18
£88.98

, to the production of the first car to bear their names. In 1905, engineer Giustino Cattaneo joined the company as technical director. It was he who was to lead Isotta Fraschini over the next 30 years to become a perfect example of world-class car manufacturing.
The firm produced numerous highly regarded models prior to World War I, including some internationally famed racers. (Among the advances attributed to Isotta Fraschini in this period was the first use of four-wheel brakes.) During the Great War, Italian naval and air forces were well served by Isotta Fraschini engines.
The first completely new design announced after the war, the Tipo 8 of 1919, launched a new single-model policy. The ingeniously constructed, near-perfectly built 6.0-liter ohv inline eight-cylinder engine of the Tipo 8 — regarded as the world’s first series-production straight eight — was held in the same esteem as the powerplants in Rolls-Royces and Hispano-Suizas.
Reliability, technical refinements, and the sedate elegance of coachbuilt bodies made Isotta Fraschini well known far beyond Italy’s borders. Above all, there were always solvent clients in the United States. By 1924, the year in which a more powerful Tipo 8A was first shown, sales branches had been established in London, Brussels, New York, Buenos Aires, and other cities with their fair share of extremely well-heeled motorists. Emperors and kings, movie stars, tycoons, boxing champions — even Pope Pius XI — swore by this automobile.
For more information on the 1947-1948 Isotta Fraschini 8C Monterosa classic sports car, continue on to the next page.
For more information on cars

Victoria Beckham Belted Grid Dress

Victoria Beckham Belted Grid Dress

BUY NOW

£581.45
£88.20

, see:

How Cruise Ships Work

In 1933, two struggling British shipping companies treaded water as the Great Depression sunk hundreds of businesses. Cunard and White Star Lines merged in 1934 and currently operate under the Cunard name, sailing cruise ships you’ve pr?obably heard of, like the Titanic and the Queen Elizabeth 2, or the QE2, and popularizing the idea of luxury travel by sea.
Unlike the more common cruise ships that ferry people from port to port in the Caribbean, the Mediterranean and some many other corners of the world (including Antartica), these old-school ocean liners still offer that original voyage that so many people signed up for: trans-Atlantic sea passage. Launched in 1967, the QE2, the largest and most extravagant ocean liner of its time built at a cost of $29 million, has made more than 800 trans-Atlantic voyages and logged more than 5.5 million nautical miles [source: BBC, Cunard].
For nearly half a century, the QE2 ruled the open waters as a reminder of an era gone past — when people sailed instead of flew, when they packed steamer trunks instead of wheeled suitcases. But times have changed, and even great ships have a lifespan. The QE2, which docks in New York Harbor, sets sail one last time in fall 2008

Victoria Beckham Outlet

Victoria Beckham Collared Dress

BUY NOW

£578.18
£88.20

. The Dubai government has purchased the historic vessel for $100 million and plans to turn it into a fancy hotel. While the QE2 is sailing into the sunset, she has plenty of friends that plan to stick around and take advantage of the lucrative cruise industry.
As you are soon to learn, cruise ships like the QE2 are floating resorts full of activities and fine dining. This article will explore the history, mechanics and inner workings of cruise ships, as well as how these giants manage to stay afloat. You’ll also hear some cruise ship criticism. So grab your boarding pass and let’s set sail through the world of cruise ships.
?

Are expensive watches better than cheap watches?

In March 2012, at a jewelry show in Switzerland, watchmaker Hublot unveiled what news reports hailed as the world’s most expensive wrist watch — a timepiece encrusted with 1,282 diamonds, including six stones that weighed more than three carats apiece. It took 17 workers 14 months to set all the stones in the one-of-a-kind timepiece. The price tag? Five million dollars. The company’s president

Victoria Beckham Dresses

Victoria Beckham Crepe Black Dress

BUY NOW

£578.18
£87.67

, Jean-Claude Biver, told the Baltimore Sun that it’d be hard to make a pricier watch than this one, given that “the surface of a watch is limited” and there just isn’t much room for more bling [source: Hennigan].
Hublot’s over-the-top watch is an elegant piece of wrist candy, to be sure, even if you wouldn’t dare to wear it on the street without an armed escort. But if you’re concerned about actually using a watch to tell time, this one probably isn’t that great of a choice, since there’s so much glitter on the face that the positions of the hour, minute and second hands are tough to discern. Also, there’s no digital display and no stopwatch mode, so it wouldn’t be very useful if you want to keep track of your pace when you go for a jog in the park. In comparison, a humble Timex Ironman T5E321, the sort of watch you can purchase on Amazon.com for as little as $47, can do all of that and far more. It has a back-lit display that you can read clearly even at night, and if you’re a traveler, you can set it to flip between two different time zones. In a pinch, it even can double as an alarm clock.
But most importantly, the $5 million watch doesn’t necessarily keep time more accurately than a $47 watch — at least to any degree you could discern. In a study published in Horological Journal in 2008, a researcher from the National Institute of Standards and Technology used sophisticated scientific equipment to test the performance of four cheap watches, including a counterfeit Rolex purchased from a street vendor for $15. He found that all four were astonishingly precise, to within a few thousandths of a second per day [source: Lombardi].
So for strictly utilitarian purposes, the answer to the question we’ve posed is a simple “no.” But “better” is subjective, and people pick watches for a lot of other reasons besides telling time. What makes one watch better than another, and how do you choose one that best suits you?